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The Half of It Review: Netflix’s Queer Teen Rom-Com Is A Charmer

The Half of It puts a queer YA spin on a classic love story, however, Wu makes it her very own – providing a lovely, wonderful as well as altogether heartfelt movie.

The Half of It places a queer YA spin on a traditional romance, nonetheless, Wu makes it her extremely own – offering a beautiful, fantastic in addition to entirely sincere film.

With The Half of It, Netflix debuts its 2nd young person retelling of Cyrano de Bergerac in numerous years, complying with 2018's Sierra Burgess is a Loser. But where Sierra turned the sex of the tale's leads, The Half of It brings a queer story right into this high school-set reinvention of the timeless tale. Written as well as guided by Alice Wu (Saving Face), The Half of It complies with a straight-A trainee that creates documents for her schoolmates to make money. She obtains worked with by a football gamer to create a letter to the lady he loves, however she has sensations for the lady also. The Half of It places a queer YA spin on a traditional love tale, however Wu makes it her very own – providing an enchanting, wonderful as well as entirely sincere movie.

Ellie Chu (Leah Lewis) is a loner with no friends, but a booming black market essay writing gig at her high school when she's approached by lovesick jock Paul Munsky (Daniel Diemer) to help him write a love letter to the girl of his dreams: Aster Flores (Alexxis Lemire). Ellie and Paul become close friends as they're working together to woo Aster, with the lovable jock breaking down many of the walls Ellie has put up over the years of being an outsider in their small town. But as both Ellie and Paul's feelings for Aster deepen, the three teenagers form a love triangle that will force each of them to confront their views on love and relationships.

Though The Half of It is ostensibly a teen rom-com, it's also a coming of age story for Ellie as she discovers what it means to be in love – what it means for her to be in love – and how to live her life to the fullest. Wu's story offers an incredibly well-crafted arc about a queer teenager who's coming to terms with their sexuality in a story that's much more nuanced than some other mainstream movies about LGBTQ youth. Ellie doesn't talk about her sexuality with a straightforward assuredness of someone much older. She's hesitant, but her sexuality isn't buried in subtext – it's a delicate balance that Wu walks beautifully. The story of The Half of It may be recognizable to viewers as a retelling of Cyrano, and the coming of age aspect of the film makes it universally relatable, but Ellie's storyline is one not often seen in Hollywood movies. Thanks to Wu's script and direction, it's not only an important story but a compelling one.

Helping to bring Wu's story to life is the young cast, the core trio of which do most of the heavy lifting – through Collin Chou delivers a warmly compelling supporting performance as Ellie's father Edwin Chu. Still, for the most part it's Lewis, Diemer and Lemire carrying The Half of It, and they do so with grace and deftness. Lewis is particularly captivating to watch as Ellie, who struggles to learn what love is through her relationships with Paul and Aster. It's not often that teenagers in movies actually feel like teenagers (though it's more common now), but Lewis captures the awkwardness and uncertainty of a teenager exceptionally well. Similarly, Diemer's Paul is the charmingly open foil to Ellie's more guarded personality. The two are sweet to watch, and their friendship easily becomes the emotional heart of the movie. While Lemire is given slightly less to work with, she brings a much-needed depth and warmth to Aster to help tie the movie's emotional themes together.

With The Half of It, Wu's latest movie joins the roster of Netflix romantic comedies – specifically its YA rom-com. Though it may be compared to Sierra Burgess is a Loser for adapting the same story or To All the Boys I've Loved Before for having an Asian-American lead, The Half of It sets itself apart as a uniquely touching story of young love and self-realization. Perhaps what The Half of It shares most with these other Netflix releases is that it likely wouldn't have been made or released under the typical studio-theatrical model, which would have been a shame. Wu's vision for her Cyrano retelling brings an entirely fresh and delightful spin to the classic with her heartfelt story of a queer teen learning about romantic love as well as the platonic love of friendship.

As such, The Half of It is certainly worth checking out for anyone interested in teen rom-coms, queer love stories, and/or coming of age tales. Wu's filmmaking sensibilities help to set the movie apart from other teen-geared romance films, while her script tells a story not often seen in Hollywood, particularly in movies made for young adults. The Half of It will be an important movie for viewers that particularly relate to Ellie, however, Wu depicts Ellie's tale in such a way that it can be relatable to all audiences. So Netflix users looking for a new movie to watch, particularly one with themes of love and hope, won't go wrong with The Half of It.

The Half of It puts a queer YA spin on a classic love story, however, Wu makes it her very own – providing a lovely, wonderful as well as entirely sincere movie.

With The Half of It, Netflix debuts its second young adult retelling of Cyrano de Bergerac in so many years, following 2018's Sierra Burgess is a Loser. But where Sierra flipped the gender of the story's leads, The Half of It brings a queer storyline into this high school-set reinvention of the classic story. Written as well as directed by Alice Wu (Saving Face), The Half of It follows a straight-A student who writes papers for her classmates to make extra money. She gets hired by a football player to write a letter to the girl he's in love with, but she has feelings for the girl as well. The Half of It puts a queer YA spin on a classic romance story, but Wu makes it her own – delivering a charming, wonderful and altogether heartfelt film.

Ellie Chu (Leah Lewis) is a loner without any pals, however a growing underground market essay composing job at her secondary school when she's come close to by lovesick jock Paul Munsky (Daniel Diemer) to assist him create a love letter to the lady of his desires: Aster Flores (Alexxis Lemire). Ellie as well as Paul end up being friends as they're collaborating to charm Aster, with the charming jock damaging down most of the wall surfaces Ellie has actually installed throughout the years of being an outsider in their village. But as both Ellie as well as Paul's sensations for Aster grow, the 3 teens create a love triangular that will certainly require each of them to face their sights on love as well as connections.

Though The Half of It is seemingly a teen rom-com, it's additionally a maturing tale for Ellie as she uncovers what it indicates to be crazy – what it indicates for her to be crazy – as well as just how to live her life to the greatest. Wu's tale uses an unbelievably well-crafted arc concerning a queer young adult that's involving terms with their sexuality in a tale that's far more nuanced than a few other mainstream films concerning LGBTQ young people. Ellie does not discuss her sexuality with an uncomplicated conviction of a person a lot older. She's reluctant, however her sexuality isn't hidden in subtext – it's a fragile equilibrium that Wu strolls magnificently. The tale of The Half of It might be identifiable to visitors as a retelling of Cyrano, as well as the maturing element of the movie makes it generally relatable, however Ellie's story is one seldom seen in Hollywood films. Thanks to Wu's manuscript as well as instructions, it's not just an essential tale however an engaging one.

Helping to bring Wu's tale to life is the young actors, the core triad of which do a lot of the hefty training – with Collin Chou provides a comfortably engaging sustaining efficiency as Ellie's dad Edwin Chu. Still, generally it's Lewis, Diemer as well as Lemire bring The Half of It, as well as they do so with elegance as well as artifice. Lewis is specifically fascinating to see as Ellie, that has a hard time to discover what love is with her connections with Paul as well as Aster. It's seldom that teens in films in fact seem like teens (though it's even more usual currently), however Lewis catches the clumsiness as well as unpredictability of a teen incredibly well. Similarly, Diemer's Paul is the charmingly open aluminum foil to Ellie's a lot more safeguarded character. The 2 are wonderful to see, as well as their relationship conveniently ends up being the psychological heart of the film. While Lemire is offered somewhat much less to deal with, she brings a much-needed deepness as well as heat to Aster to assist link the film's psychological styles with each other.

With The Half of It, Wu's most current film signs up with the lineup of Netflix charming funnies – particularly its YA rom-com. Though it might be contrasted to Sierra Burgess is a Loser for adjusting the very same tale or To All the Boys I've Loved Before for having an Asian-American lead, The Half of It establishes itself apart as a uniquely touching tale of puppy love as well as self-realization. Perhaps what The Half of It shares most with these various other Netflix launches is that it likely would not have actually been made or launched under the normal studio-theatrical version, which would certainly have been a pity. Wu's vision for her Cyrano retelling brings an totally fresh as well as fascinating spin to the classic with her heartfelt story of a queer teen learning about romantic love as well as the platonic love of friendship.

As such, The Half of It is certainly worth checking out for anyone interested in teen rom-coms, queer love stories, and/or coming of age tales. Wu's filmmaking sensibilities help to set the movie apart from other teen-geared romance films, while her script tells a story not often seen in Hollywood, particularly in movies made for young adults. The Half of It will be an important movie for viewers that particularly relate to Ellie, however, Wu depicts Ellie's tale in such a way that it can be relatable to all audiences. So Netflix users looking for a new movie to watch, particularly one with themes of love and hope, won't go wrong with The Half of It.

The Half of It puts a queer YA spin on a classic love story, however, Wu makes it her very own – providing a lovely, wonderful as well as altogether heartfelt movie.

With The Half of It, Netflix debuts its second young adult retelling of Cyrano de Bergerac in so many years, following 2018's Sierra Burgess is a Loser. But where Sierra flipped the gender of the story's leads, The Half of It brings a queer storyline into this high school-set reinvention of the classic story. Written and directed by Alice Wu (Saving Face), The Half of It follows a straight-A student who writes papers for her classmates to make extra money. She gets hired by a football player to write a letter to the girl he's in love with, but she has feelings for the girl as well. The Half of It puts a queer YA spin on a classic romance story, but Wu makes it her own – delivering a charming, sweet and altogether heartfelt movie.

Ellie Chu (Leah Lewis) is a loner with no friends, but a booming black market essay writing gig at her high school when she's approached by lovesick jock Paul Munsky (Daniel Diemer) to help him write a love letter to the girl of his dreams: Aster Flores (Alexxis Lemire). Ellie and Paul become close friends as they're working together to woo Aster, with the lovable jock breaking down many of the walls Ellie has put up over the years of being an outsider in their small town. But as both Ellie and Paul's feelings for Aster deepen, the three teenagers form a love triangle that will force each of them to confront their views on love and relationships.

Though The Half of It is ostensibly a teen rom-com, it's also a coming of age story for Ellie as she discovers what it means to be in love – what it means for her to be in love – and how to live her life to the fullest. Wu's story offers an incredibly well-crafted arc about a queer teenager who's coming to terms with their sexuality in a story that's much more nuanced than some other mainstream movies about LGBTQ youth. Ellie doesn't talk about her sexuality with a straightforward assuredness of someone much older. She's hesitant, but her sexuality isn't buried in subtext – it's a delicate balance that Wu walks beautifully. The story of The Half of It may be recognizable to viewers as a retelling of Cyrano, and the coming of age aspect of the film makes it universally relatable, but Ellie's storyline is one not often seen in Hollywood movies. Thanks to Wu's script and direction, it's not only an important story but a compelling one.

Helping to bring Wu's story to life is the young cast, the core trio of which do most of the heavy lifting – through Collin Chou delivers a warmly compelling supporting performance as Ellie's father Edwin Chu. Still, for the most part it's Lewis, Diemer and Lemire carrying The Half of It, and they do so with grace and deftness. Lewis is particularly captivating to watch as Ellie, who struggles to learn what love is through her relationships with Paul and Aster. It's not often that teenagers in movies actually feel like teenagers (though it's more common now), but Lewis captures the awkwardness and uncertainty of a teenager exceptionally well. Similarly, Diemer's Paul is the charmingly open foil to Ellie's more guarded personality. The two are sweet to watch, and their friendship easily becomes the emotional heart of the movie. While Lemire is given slightly less to work with, she brings a much-needed depth and warmth to Aster to help tie the movie's emotional themes together.

With The Half of It, Wu's latest movie joins the roster of Netflix romantic comedies – specifically its YA rom-com. Though it may be compared to Sierra Burgess is a Loser for adapting the same story or To All the Boys I've Loved Before for having an Asian-American lead, The Half of It sets itself apart as a uniquely touching story of young love and self-realization. Perhaps what The Half of It shares most with these other Netflix releases is that it likely wouldn't have been made or released under the typical studio-theatrical model, which would have been a shame. Wu's vision for her Cyrano retelling brings an entirely fresh and fascinating spin to the classic with her heartfelt story of a queer teen learning about romantic love as well as the platonic love of friendship.

As such, The Half of It is certainly worth checking out for anyone interested in teen rom-coms, queer love stories, as well as/or coming of age tales. Wu's filmmaking sensibilities help to set the movie apart from other teen-geared romance films, while her script tells a tale not often seen in Hollywood, particularly in movies made for young adults. The Half of It will be an important film for viewers that specifically relate to Ellie, however, Wu depicts Ellie's tale in such a way that it can be relatable to all audiences. So Netflix users looking for a new film to watch, specifically one with styles of love as well as hope, will not fail with The Half of It.

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